by Carlos Moreno On the morning of Tuesday, December 1st, 1908, J.B. Stradford and his wife Augusta boarded a train from Kansas on the Katy line to Tulsa, Oklahoma. They refused to ride in the furthest train car, reserved for Black passengers, behind the cars that carried animals. The conductor
by Carlos Moreno On a warm summer Tuesday evening on June 1st, 1971, dozens of parishioners and community members gathered at Mt. Zion Baptist Church to hear Mabel Little speak. W.D. Williams, son of John and Loula Williams and history teacher at Booker T. Washington High School, hosted the event
By Carlos Moreno Every Tulsa historian would agree that among the most tragic of the deaths which occurred during the Race Massacre of 1921 was that of Dr. A.C. Jackson. The esteemed physician and surgeon was well-respected not only in Greenwood but across medical circles throughout the country. However, relatively
by Carlos Moreno Tulsa historian Scott Ellsworth’s Death in a Promised Land opens with the story of a young Bill Williams asking his father why they relocated from Mississippi to Oklahoma. “Well,” his father answered, “I came out to the Promised Land.” For black freedmen and young black men and
by Carlos Moreno During his life, O.W. Gurley was an educator, a church founder, a presidential appointee, a general store owner, a hotel proprietor, a landlord, a deputy police officer, and most famously, the founder of the Greenwood District in Tulsa, OK. His vision of a prosperous black community would

One Comment on “The Victory of Greenwood: J. B. Stradford”

  1. Pingback: Police Brutality Against Citizens is Nothing New - BeyondBelief

Leave a Reply